James Frith, MP for Bury North, is joining Alzheimer’s Research UK to call for greater awareness of dementia and the need for more research. The announcement comes ahead of World Alzheimer’s Day (Saturday 21st September) and as the charity launches a major new awareness campaign fronted by Samuel L. Jackson.

Despite dementia now being the UK’s leading cause of death, a recent poll found that 22% still incorrectly believe that dementia is an inevitable part of getting older. Alzheimer’s Research has joined forces with Samuel L. Jackson for the #ShareTheOrange campaign to highlight that physical diseases cause dementia using an orange to symbolise the weight of matter lost in the brain as the condition develops.

Diseases like Alzheimer’s are not a normal part of the ageing process. They are physical diseases that damage the brain. This is the message at the heart of Alzheimer’s Research UK’s Share the Orange campaign. Samuel’s family has been impacted by Alzheimer’s more than most, having had six relatives diagnosed with the disease. He said:

“It’s been proven from other diseases throughout history that where there is research, there can be a cure. Where there is research, there is hope. By sharing the knowledge that diseases like Alzheimer’s are not simply part and parcel of old age, we have the power to push research forward and put an end to this devastation. We must act now to speed up research towards breakthroughs.”

James Frith MP said:

“I’m proud to support the Alzheimer’s Research UK campaign to raise awareness about pernicious diseases, like Alzheimer’s, which cause dementia. Dementia is not an inevitable part of getting older and we can and must eradicate these diseases.

“More research is needed to support the ground-breaking work of Alzheimer’s Research UK and others trying to combat dementia. I’ve written to the Prime Minister to ask him to provide more funding for dementia research and I hope he’ll listen to our call.”

Alzheimer’s Research UK is the UK’s leading dementia research charity and last year pledged to commit a landmark £250m of funding towards pioneering medical research into the condition by 2025.

Dementia is the world’s greatest medical challenge, not only for the individuals affected and their families, but for society as a whole. Over 850,000 people in the UK have dementia, and the condition has an economic impact in the UK of over £26bn a year – more than cancer and heart disease combined.

Watch the video

Link to Instagram Link to Twitter Link to YouTube Link to Facebook Link to LinkedIn Link to Snapchat Close Fax Website Location Phone Email Calendar Building Search